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  1. #1

    Default How It's Done - Projects around the Shop

    Billy & I have decided to start an on going thread called “How it’s Done”. This will be an informative and educational thread to show how things are done in the Machine Shop.

    After being a member of this most wonderful site, I’ve noticed ads & recommendations to many other shops that do custom work. I’ve noticed that most of the time you are led to believe the other facilities manufacture their own products. Fact is, this is seldom true. The custom cylinders come from www.CPindinc.com, the sleeves come from either www.nwsleeve.com or www.lasleeve.com. This kind of work is seldom done by your local engine builder, it’s far beyond their capabilities.

    This isn’t a competition on who knows the most or the best or any of that stuff. We hope that any of you will reply with comments, questions & criticism on anything which you see in the thread. Billy will do a monthly recap or something depending on how things go with our endeavors. I expect to do a weekly addition to the thread. Subjects will be random depending on the projects that come across my work bench.


    Index

    1. Measuring tools
    2. Cylinder boring prep., Hone introduction
    3. Hones cont. Sleeve preparation & comments
    4. How strong is that piston, Sleeves & cylinder etching
    5. Boring & Sleeving A Mercury V-6
    6. Boring & Honing, 2-stroke ideas, That mighty old Dale Herbrandson Reed Valve. DH Reed valves started everything in the
    reed valve business.
    7. Sleeving LT250R cylinder, Bore & hone a Yamaha twin.
    8. Mandrels, coils, some handy information.
    9. Stainless steel head studs, Foundry patterns for new cylinder liners.
    10. Replace main bearing support bushings.
    12. CR500 compression releases + or -
    15. CR500 Liner replacement
    16.-18. General discusion
    19. Your Sleeve shrink fit, Sleeve foundry patterns.


    40. Main bearing inserts the CNC way, How to figure your Squish Band.
    41. Sleeving LT250R, Some coil inserts, Torque plates.
    42. Sleeving 350 Yamaha, Replacing stripped exhaust threads.
    43. Montessa Reed valve, Old time water coolers.

    48. KX500 Sleeve instalation
    51. Compression calculations
    54. Sleeve 650 Triumph twin



    40 years & still moving along.

    New Cylinder boring bar stand.

    My background is a lifetime in the Machine Shop. I’m now 65 and started boring cylinders some 45 years ago. As you all have probably noticed from some of my comments, I also have a lot to learn. We all must humble ourselves and learn something new each day. Please chime in when you have some good ideas to share with the readership. Most of your replies to my stumbling comments have been polite and constructive. Please keep a positive attitude with your replies and it should all be worth our efforts.

    Since I’ve become a member of E2S, I’m starting to see a lot of the JUNK work which others have paid a lot of money, only to end up in disappointment. I’d like to show and explain how things would be done from the “Old Dog” perspective. No Jetting, Timing, Pipes or Dyno tuning. That’s for the rest of you folks who know about that kind of stuff, Jump in.


    Measuring tools: This is an example of some of the Junk which floats around and the tools used to help avoid some of the problems.



    A dial or digital caliper is an economical and handy measuring tool. When some close measurements are required, you need to step up to a micrometer and dial gauges.






    A 250cc cylinder converted into a maximum Big Bore engine. The bore is so large that there is no Head Gasket surface left. Common sense would tell us that this isn’t a good idea.




    Sometimes a sleeve needs to be mounted on a Mandrel in order to get accurate measurements for calculating the Squeeze fit.



    The Dial Bore Gauge is the work horse in the bore measuring department. A little spendy, but well worth the investment. When you farm out your cylinder machine work, you can check up on what your engine guy is really doing.




    Measurements on the lathe. Over time, you’ll get a Feel for your tools.
    A minimal invest in precision measuring tools is a fine addition to your tool chest.

    We're new at this, Fire away with your questions.

    “Old Dog” www.smallenginemachineworks.com
    JT
    I've worked on the layout of this thread all Morning. I GIVE UP.
    Last edited by John Tice; 5 Days Ago at 05:40 PM.

  2. #2

    Question




    Yes I can: Photo Bucket does it. Check back
    next week.
    JT

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    880

    Default

    This is awesome and while many of us are excitedly in line for this, many others on this site are still at the Suck Squeeze Bang Blow stage of the game. What do we have in line for these folks to get them up to the speed of this thread?

  4. #4

    Default

    We can go any place we wish in the Machine Shop area. As time goes by questions will come up that will generate more interest.

    Here are larger pictures.

    Measuring tools: This is an example of some of the Junk which floats around and the tools used to help avoid some of the problems.


    40 years & still moving along.




    A dial or digital caliper is an economical and handy measuring tool. When some close measurements are required, you need to step up to a micrometer and dial gauges.


    Sometimes a sleeve needs to be mounted on a Mandrel in order to get accurate measurements for calculating the Squeeze fit.


    The Dial Bore Gauge is the work horse in the bore measuring department. A little spendy, but well worth the investment. When you farm out your cylinder machine work, you can check up on what your engine guy is really doing.



    A 250cc cylinder converted into a maximum Big Bore engine. The bore is so large that there is no Head Gasket surface left. Common sense would tell us that this isnít a good idea.


    Dial Gauge for longitudinal carriage adjustment.


    Measurements on the lathe. Over time, youíll get a Feel for your tools.
    A minimal investment in precision measuring tools is a fine addition to your tool chest.
    We're new at this, Fire away with your questions.

    ďOld DogĒ www.smallenginemachineworks.com
    JT

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,007

    Default

    I think this thread is an excellent idea and will be able to help alot of people. Maybe a few articles about how to use and calibrate a micrometer, the correct way to measure the bore on a cylinder and how to measure the stroke of a crankshaft would be a good place to start? I look forward to learning some things from this thread
    Last edited by bansheekx; 05-20-2012 at 04:26 PM.

    1992 banshee
    2000kx250
    1999 polaris 400 sport

  6. #6

    Default

    Great Idea: Next week, I'm thinking about how to set it up.
    JT

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    3,139

    Default

    Thanks man! This is some good reading, and I'm thinking about going into machining/welding. I'm going to Mesa Community College next semester to start an associates degree program for welding and I'm ready to learn how to fix my own stuff, build some cool stuff, and have fun doin it!
    2004 Banshee
    421 cheetah cub HJR drag porting N1-5 override 35mm PWK's (alcohol converted) Shearer Small Bores Slingshot Clutch
    +2 +1 lonestar arms with elkas and +2 durablue axle custom extended Lonestar +10 swingarm


  8. #8

    Thumbs up

    Hi Banshee Boy: Starting with welding classes will be the most gratifying. You can do more for yourself and earn some extra bux with little investments. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) & MIG (Metal arc Inert Gas) also some Torch work should be in the curriculum. Many of the E2S members contribute regularly with their projects. Any good welder can always find employment. Youíre getting a good start as soon as you start to accumulate a quality tool assortment which will last a lifetime.
    As far as machine work goes, it takes generations to accumulate the equipment and knowledge. We all started somewhere. When I started SEMW, I did it in my fatherís back room of his hardware manufacturing business. Iím hoping that my grandson might continue with what we have started. Any of you folks can do the same. Only in America as they say. In my earlier years I would stay at the shop and bore cylinders till I just about dropped. Your business commitments will be hard on the marriage. (Keep your Finger Nails Clean).
    Iím hoping to help give you folks a jump start with this column.
    JT

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    SOMD
    Posts
    7,770

    Default

    HAHA totaly agree on the dirty finger nails part no matter how trivial that sounds. My lady has complained about them. I def have a stiff haired brush in my shower.
    "Paul,
    Thanks for sending the pictures - looks like a lot of fun! You did a great job."
    Regards,
    Bob Hannah

    My motor is from 79'....Where will your 450 be in 30 years???
    DC facebook / Paul Baugher
    For details click here

  10. #10

    Default

    That's the most important tip that can ever be passed along.